E-sports

How Nerd Street Gamers highlights each facet of its esports infrastructure business with its new gaming facility – Digiday

Summary

Nerd Street Gamers unveiled “The Block” last Friday, a 40,000-square-foot gaming and esports facility — or “esports campus” — in central Philadelphia.

The black-and-green-accented facility contains over 100 PC gaming setups in an area it calls “The Pit,” along with a central stage and event space that can seat several hundred spectators. It also features a 15,000-square-foot space on the fifth floor that will become the locatio…….

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Nerd Street Gamers unveiled “The Block” last Friday, a 40,000-square-foot gaming and esports facility — or “esports campus” — in central Philadelphia.

The black-and-green-accented facility contains over 100 PC gaming setups in an area it calls “The Pit,” along with a central stage and event space that can seat several hundred spectators. It also features a 15,000-square-foot space on the fifth floor that will become the location of Nerd Street’s corporate offices in 2022. The space will host both national esports tournaments and Nerd Street’s own amateur events — a marriage of the robust content and event production wings that power Nerd Street’s own unique approach to the esports infrastructure business.

When CEO John Fazio founded Nerd Street Gamers in 2011, it was a LAN (local area network) party, not a full-fledged gaming and esports company. Over the next few years, NSG expanded its community and reputation by hosting events such as Fragadelphia, a long-running open Counter-Strike tournament series. But in 2016, the business was incorporated, invested in — and then, as Fazio said, “it was off to the races.”

Since then, NSG has become a household name among esports industry veterans. It provides turnkey event production and operation services to game developers such as Riot Games, which employs Nerd Street to produce its Wild Rift Summoner Series, in addition to brands such as Red Bull, which hosted its Conquest fighting game tournament series in NSG venues.

Nerd Street Gamers is not the only player in the esports infrastructure game. One of its competitors, Vindex, provides similar event production services to many of the top-tier esports leagues. Unlike Vindex, however, Nerd Street is not satisfied remaining in the shadows. In addition to its turnkey services, it’s also a front-facing entertainment brand and content production firm, using its relationship with prominent esports leagues to elevate the Nerd Street brand.

“It happened by accident,” Fazio said. “We were running [StarCraft II tournament] Cheesadelphia, and were like, ‘OK, let’s throw up a computer and stream this.’ And we had tens of thousands of people in South Korea and France watching a tournament in a North Philly warehouse.” Nowadays, NSG’s content operation includes thousands of hours of video and live-streamed content, in addition to bespoke, high-production-value projects such as its upcoming podcast series produced in collaboration with esports journalist Jacob Wolf.

At the moment, Nerd Street has its hands in three sectors: an event production side, a content side, and a physical esports arena business that now boasts 13 affiliated facilities across the United States. While there is a turnkey aspect to all three, NSG vp of marketing Paige Funk made it clear that Nerd Street always serves both itself and its clients. “We run tournaments under the Nerd Street brand; we operate tournaments for third parties,” she said. “Same thing with content: we create content under the Nerd Street brand; we create content for third parties.” 

These different facets of Nerd Street’s business operate symbiotically. “All …….

Source: https://digiday.com/marketing/how-nerd-street-gamers-highlights-each-facet-of-its-esports-infrastructure-business-with-its-new-gaming-facility/